Bitesize learning to support transition to adult care

Bitesize learning to support transition to adult care

13 May 2021

Bitesize learning to support transition to adult care
For many young patients with chronic conditions, the move from children’s to adult care can be a challenging experience.

Adjusting to receiving support from a new team can make the transition process complicated for everyone involved. This process is not always well understood by parents, doctors, nurses, therapists, teachers alike.

Thanks to a £60,000 grant from Imperial Health Charity, consultant in paediatric allergy and immunology Dr Claudia Gore is setting up a new ‘one-for-all’ Adolescent Health Transition e-Hub to help tackle this issue.

This web-based resource - the ’11to25Hub’ - will include 10 core modules, covering several key areas of adolescent healthcare transition such as peer support, having better conversations, being independent, mental health, prescriptions, and much more. 

The modules will be designed to allow learning for all from the same material to achieve basic understanding and awareness. 

"It's designed to give those involved the tools to understand the transition journey.”

Dr Claudia Gore

Chris Bound, experienced senior clinical nurse specialist for children and young people with diabetes will be the Digital Champion at the Trust for this project. He will curate content for the hub, bring people together to give input and work with the wider team on pulling together a mix of older and new resources from around the globe.

To bring lived experience into the hub and the modules, the project team includes Pip Hardy and Tony Sumner from the Patient Voices Programme. Forming part of this programme, is the charity funded workshop project, Terrific Teens where patients and their parents share their transition stories. These lived experiences aim to inform and support those affected by and living with chronic conditions.

“When we think about healthcare transition, it’s not just the young people who have to get to grips with it,” said Dr Gore.

“It’s also the parents coming to terms with the transfer of responsibility, and teachers who need to understand why, for example, their student going through GCSEs has got these added pressures.”

Dr Gore and her colleagues came up with the idea in their weekly ‘Big Room’ meetings – a quality improvement group led by Dr Katie Malbon and Mr Paul Doyle, where staff come together to improve existing models of care.

“Without the charity’s funding, this area of innovation wouldn’t happen.”

Dr Claudia Gore

In addition to supporting patients and families, the e-hub will also help healthcare professionals understand how to better support young patients going through this experience.

Dr Gore said: “I thought we needed one place where we can have easy, digestible information that people can access when they have a short amount of time available.”

In the future, Dr Gore hopes to expand the online resource to support other condition-specific teams across the Trust.  

“It’s in one place and designed to give those involved the tools to understand the transition journey,” said Dr Gore.

“Without the charity’s funding, this area of innovation wouldn’t happen.”

This project is funded by Imperial Health Charity as part of our Innovate at Imperial grants programme, which aims to provide opportunities for permanent staff at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust to explore innovate ways of improving health and social care. Since 2019, we have awarded over £1.25 million to support over 20 projects.

Applications for the third round of Innovate at Imperial are now open for Trust staff. Click here to find out more.